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Forecasts say it's going to be a hot summer

Here's how to stay safe in the heat.

June 07, 2024
A tree with the sun shining behind it. 

Increased heat means increased chances of heat-related illness.

“The most basic one is heat cramps,” said Dr. Eric Hill, ER physician and EMS medical director of The Medical Center of Aurora. “That’s when your muscles kind of tighten up. It's usually just an electrolyte problem. Your next level is heat exhaustion and heat exhaustion is… you're fatigued, you're tired, you're typically still sweating… You definitely need to get out of the heat. At this point, you're in danger of going into heatstroke.”

Watch the Denver7 story.

Find an emergency room near you.

Published:
June 07, 2024

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